September 26, 2022

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Anne Frank may have been reprimanded by a Jewish notary for wanting to save her family

Known around the world since its release His diary Written between 1942 and 1944 while he and his family were hiding in a secret apartment in Amsterdam. Anne Frank And his family may have been reprimanded by a Jewish notary. The study is preserved in the book “The Betrayal of Anne Frank” by Canadian author Rosemary Sullivan.

It is based on an investigation by a former FBI agent into the mystery surrounding the man who denounced a young Jewish woman and her relatives. It may have been a Jewish notary, the book says, who did this to save his own family.

The trial of this unresolved court case lasted for more than six years. The allegations against Arnold van den Berg, who died in 1950, are backed up by evidence, including an anonymous letter sent to Anne Frank’s father after World War II, according to Dutch media reports.

“Attractive hypothesis” that requires further investigation

The Anne Frank House Museum Retired Federal Bureau of Investigation Detective Vincent Bangkok said the results of the investigation led to an “attractive hypothesis” but needed further investigation. A 15-year-old girl and her family were ambushed in a secret apartment in Amsterdam, arrested in 1944 and died the following year. Le Camp de Concentration de Bergen-Belsen.

Various theories have long been spread about this raid that revealed the secret connection that the family was lurking. Van den Berg’s name has attracted little attention so far, but came to the fore during the trial, which used a large amount of data using modern techniques, including artificial intelligence.

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The investigation reduced the list of suspects to four, with Arnold van den Berg, a founding member of the Jewish Council, the governing body that forced the Nazis to organize the deportation of Jews. Investigators found that his family had a deportation exemption, which was revoked during Franks’ betrayal, but was not deported for unknown reasons.

Ronald Leopold, managing director of Anne Frank House, warned that there were questions about the anonymous letter and that further investigation was needed. “If you’re not 100 percent or 200 percent sure, you have to be very careful in writing history as someone who betrayed Anne Frank,” he told the AFP.