November 27, 2022

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More than 50% of CEOs say they’re considering laying off jobs within the next six months — and remote workers may be the first to go to

C-Suite’s sirens about the looming recession are gaining volume in America and elsewhere, but calls to the office for full-time work are softer. Most CEOs around the world have shared the view that a recession is looming sooner rather than later, according to a Tuesday report from KPMG on entrepreneurs’ expectations. From a report: Nine out of 10 CEOs in the United States (91%) believe a recession will arrive in the next 12 months, while 86% of CEOs globally feel the same way, according to findings from the international auditing, tax and consulting firm. This reflects the ominous expectations of big-name investors on Wall Street such as Stanley Druckenmiller. In America, half of CEOs (51%) said they are considering reducing the workforce within the next six months — and in the global survey overall, eight out of ten CEOs said the same. One caveat for people who like to work from home: Remote workers may find it to their advantage to show their faces in the office as their job security becomes more uncertain.

It is “likely” and/or “highly likely” that remote workers will be laid off first, according to a majority (60%) of 3,000 managers surveyed by beautiful.ai, a presentation software company. 20% were undecided, and the remaining 20% ​​said that was unlikely. When asked how they expected their company’s three-year working arrangement for traditional in-office jobs, nearly half (45%) of US CEOs said it would be a hybrid of in-person and remote work. A third (34%) said jobs would remain in the office, and 20% said they would be entirely away. CEOs around the world seemed more keen on personal work. Two-thirds (65%) said office work was ideal, 28% said hybrid work would be the way, and 7% said it would be quite far. Global results were obtained from business leaders in the United States, but also from CEOs in Australia, Canada, China, India, Japan, some countries in the European Union and the United Kingdom.

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