April 15, 2024

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Venetian authorities reveal why the canal has turned fluorescent green

Luigi Costantini/AP

A gondola crosses the historic Grand Canal of Venice as it is splattered with a green phosphorescent liquid, Sunday May 28, 2023.



CNN

A mysterious patch of fluorescent green water that appeared in Venice The famous Grand Canal Environmental authorities said Sunday’s cause was a chemical commonly used in underwater construction to help identify leaks.

The chemical – fluorescein – is non-toxic. It’s still not clear how this material ended up in the canal, but Venice’s regional environmental agency (ARPAV) said that given the volume emitted, it was unlikely to be an accident.

Residents first noticed this green spot near the Rialto Bridge on Sunday morning local time and it grew slowly during the day.

Pictures showed gondolas, water taxis and water bus boats zipping through the emerald material.

Luigi Costantini/AP

Gondolas sail at the Rialto Bridge on Venice’s historic Grand Canal as it splatters with a slick of green phosphorescent liquid, Sunday May 28, 2023.

Luigi Costantini/AP

People notice the historic Grand Canal of Venice dotted with a splash of green phosphorescent liquid.

No group has claimed responsibility for the act, and local police are investigating a number of leads, including environmental activity, a Venice police spokesperson told CNN.

More test results are expected later this week, which could help determine the exact amount of the substance in the water.

Luca Zaia, president of the Venice region, warned that environmental activists may be doing copycat work.

More test results are expected later this week, which could help determine the exact amount of the substance in the water.

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Curious coloring came up City We celebrated the Vogalonga Boat Event, created to combat wave action, restore Venetian traditions and help spread interest in the environment and nature as well as the Architecture Biennale, which opened last weekend.

This is not the first time that the Grand Canal in Venice has changed color.

In 1968, during the annual Venice Biennale, Argentine artist Nicolás García Uriburu dyed the waters of the canal green with a fluorescent dye called fluorescein. The move is designed to draw attention to environmental issues and the relationship between nature and civilization.